Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some common questions our team receives, and answers to them.

General

What is an MPAN number?

MPAN stands for Meter Point Administration Number. Occasionally mentioned as a ‘Supply Number’ or ‘S Number’. MPAN numbers are unique to a specific property and are used by energy providers to select your electricity rates. Need to find your MPAN number? Take a look at your electricity bill, the 21 digits long number should be presented in a similar fashion to the image above.

List of contact information for energy suppliers

Corona Energy
Phone: 0800 804 8589
Email: info@coronaenergy.co.uk
https://www.coronaenergy.co.uk/contact-us/
 
SSE Business Energy
Phone: 0345 725 2526
https://www.ssebusinessenergy.co.uk/contact-us/
 
Dual Energy
Phone: 01903 703400
Email: customer.services@dual-energy.co.uk
http://www.dual-energy.co.uk/contact
 
EDF Business Energy
Phone: 0333 200 5103
https://www.edfenergy.com/sme-business/help-advice/faqs
 
EON Business Energy
Phone: 0333 202 4586
https://www.eonenergy.com/contact/phone-numbers.html
 
Haven Power
Phone: 1473 277556
https://www.havenpower.com/contact-us/
 
Opus Business Energy
Phone: 0843 227 2377
Email: contactus@opusenergy.com
https://www.opusenergy.com/contact-us/
 
Hudson Energy
Phone: 0330 088 2679
Email: customerservice@hudsonenergy.co.uk
https://www.hudsonenergy.co.uk/contact
 
Total Gas & Power
Phone: 0333 003 7874
https://www.gas-power.total.co.uk/help-support
 
Crown Oil Ltd.
Phone: 0845 340 3985
Email: hello@crownoil.co.uk
https://www.crownoil.co.uk/contact-us/
 
Xcel Energy
Phone: 0800 999 3315
http://www.xcelenergy.co.uk/contact.html
 
Dong Energy
Phone: 0207 257 0100
https://orsted.co.uk/en
 
British Gas Business Energy
Phone: 0800 294 0015
https://www.britishgas.co.uk/business/help-and-support
 
EOn Business Energy
Phone: 0345 303 4060
https://www.eonenergy.com/business/help.html
 
NPower Business Energy
Phone Business Gas: 0845 166 3320
Phone Business Electricity: 0845 166 3360
https://www.npower.com/business/help-and-support/contact-us/how-to-make-
a-complaint/
 
Scottish Power Business Energy
Phone: 0845 270 0700
Email: customer.services@scottishpower.co.uk
https://www.scottishpower.co.uk/small-business/customer-services/
 
Gazprom Business Energy
Phone: 0845 230 0011
Email: enquiries@gazprom-energy.com
https://www.gazprom-energy.co.uk/help-and-support/
 
CNG Business Energy
Phone: 0142 350 2554
Email: info@cngltd.co.uk
https://www.cngltd.co.uk/contact/help-support

What information is needed for my new contract?

  1. Address of your new property
  2. The day you are moving in
  3. Sometimes you will need your Meter Number if you have a half hourly meter, but our app will help you with that.

I've moved premises, who's my supplier?

The previous tenant’s business energy supplier is providing the electricity. The previous tenant should have informed their business gas and electricity supplier that they were moving out. The business energy company will still supply gas and electricity but will charge you ‘Out of Contract’ rates.

What are out of contract rates?

Out of Contract rates means that the energy company can charge you whatever rates they want because you have not signed a new business energy contract. These rates tend to be very high. The best solution is to find the cheapest business gas and electricity deal and to sign a new business energy supply contract. You can find the lowest prices very fast with EnergyBillKill. Use our online app by clicking here >

Should I switch supplier before I move premises?

If you have time, the best step is to set up your new business energy contract before you move in. You can do this in less than 10 minutes with the EnergyBillKill app. To start, click here >

Should I do a private energy audit?

Energy audits are a mandatory practice for big companies (> 250 employees).

You can use a wide range of energy auditors in the UK who provide will do a short consultation. They will highlight how you can save money. You can also do a telephone audit where you can gain some invaluable advice.

The government heavily promotes Energy savings. You can read more about the schemes here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/energy-savings-opportunity-scheme-esos

Should I do an energy audit myself?

Basic checks will go a long way to help you save energy – the type of light bulbs you are using, insulation in windows and doors, automated lights switching etc… For example in the UK kettles that take too long to boil water generate extra £60+ million per year in energy spending.

  • Switch off computer displays when not in use, especially overnight or at the weekend
  • Switch off the lights when everyone has gone home.
  • Use light sensors that automatically turn off when no one is in the room
  • Insulation massively improves business energy efficiency within.
  • Change light bulbs. There are two main varieties of energy-efficient light bulbs on the market – Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and the more popular choice, Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs).
  • Use printers less.

How do I get a rebate from my energy supplier?

You want your money back because you have paid too much to the energy provider. If you are having problems claiming your money back from energy providers, then Ofgem, the industry regulator can help. Ofgem enforces regulations that force suppliers to refund any money that they owed to their customers.

Many of the Big Six energy providers will automatically refund you. As with any contractual question, please ensure that you have all your appropriate details before calling the energy supplier. These may include:

  • Bank details,
  • Account information
  • The latest meter reading

With many suppliers, you can now request refunds online. If you all else fails, you can complain to Ofgem by clicking here.

How do I know if i'm due an energy bill rebate?

There are a few ways to check, try;

  • Checking your online account
  • Look at your latest statement
  • Check your old bills
  • Call the business energy supplier if you have lost your bills

What is the contract end date and notice period?

End date:

The end date is when your current business energy contract ends. If you do not renew your contract or switch energy providers, your business energy tariff will go up.

Notice period:

You will need to notify your current business gas or business electricity provider before you switch to another supplier. You need to give notice in advance of the end date for your contract to avoid your tariffs going up.

How do I get to grips with my business electricity bill?

Business electricity bills can be confusing. We recommend focusing on basic details that tell you how much you spend and how much electricity you use. The details you should find on your business electricity bill are:

  • Your supplier details.
  • Date of when the business energy bill was issued.
  • Billing period
  • Last payment made (date and amount)
  • The customer reference number or account number.
  • The final amount of the electricity you’ve used in this period before VAT is added.
  • The standard amount of VAT
  • The total price of your energy bill;
  • The amount you need to pay your energy supplier.
  • Energy supplier electricity supply number.
  • Your meter number
  • A detailed breakdown of the electricity used will be shown on the bill (kilowatt hours (kWh) used, cost per kilowatt hour).
  • The bill will state if the meter readings are estimated or actual.
  • A contact number will be provided on the bill for customers who have specific needs such as large print Braille.
  • A payment slip
  • The total of your last bill
  • Payment Due Date

How do I get to grips with my business energy bill?

Business gas bills are a pain to understand. To make life simple, you can just focus on five things: price, tariff, supplier, day and night rates. If you find the above in information, you are all set to understand your gas bill.

The business gas bill summary should show:

    • The total of your last bill,
    • How much was paid since the last bill
    • The charges the client incurred for the period of time including any discounts the client is applicable for.
    • The bill will also show any account adjustments.
    • The overall amount of debit or credit that their account is in. This will only be for information only for Direct Debit customer.
    • The date the business gas bill should be paid by.

The complete business gas bill should have the following information:

  • Business Energy suppliers contact details.
  • The date the supplier issued the gas bill
  • The gas billing period, (showing the dates the bill refers to).
  • The date and amount of the last payment you made
  • Your unique customer business reference number or account number. Normally this is shown at the top of the page.
  • The final amount of gas you’ve used in this period before VAT is added.
  • The standard amount of Business VAT of 20% (domestic VAT is less at 5%) should be shown separately.
  • The total price of your gas bill (how much you need to pay your supplier).
  • Other information that a supplier wishes to share with the customer will often appear on the front of the bill.
  • Most gas suppliers show their gas supply number in a box. This can be printed in a very small font. Please look carefully.
  • Your meter point reference number. You will need this to switch business gas suppliers.
  • A detailed breakdown of business gas used. The usage is provided, including the cubit feet (Cu FT) used, cost, and the latest meter readings.
  • The bill will state if the meter readings are estimated or actual.
  • The bill will also state the dates the readings were taken or estimated.
  • Customers who have specific business requirements such as large print or bills in braille will be provided with a special contact number.
  • A bill will typically include a payment slip for businesses who chose to pay their gas via direct debit, by bank or by post.

What are unit rates and standing charges?

The standing charge is the cost you have to pay daily, regardless of whether or not any energy is actually used. The unit rate is the fee that’s payable on every unit of energy consumed. Its measurement is kWh, or kilowatt hours. Your electricity bill almost always has a standing charge. Some business gas bills may not have a standing charge on the bill.

What do I need if the energy supplier stops trading?

Ofgem is the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets, a non-ministerial government department who independently monitor the energy market. When a supplier stops trading. Ofgem ensures that the supply of energy continues to customers. They call it the Ofgem safety net. Ofgem gives responsibility to a new supplier for the customers of the closed energy company. They do their best to ensure that you do not notice the transition. We recommend you visit the Ofgem safety net site by clicking here.

What about my contract?

When Ofgem replaces your current supplier with a new supplier all old tariffs will end. You will be transferred onto a ‘deemed’ contract. A ‘deemed’ contract is one that you, as a customer, have not chosen. Very often your prices may go up as a result of the above.  Ofgem tends to accept this because the new supplier is assuming the risk and responsibility with new as a customer from a failed supplier. Please note that Ofem does not protect business customers’ credit balances. It is your responsibility to contact the insolvency company to get your money back. When Ofgem have replaced your business energy provider, the new supplier contacts you and provide guidance on outstanding credit balances. Once you have been contacted by your new supplier you are then free to shop around for a better deal (it is best not to switch suppliers during the transition). You can you EnergyBillKill to switch easily.

What do I need if the energy supplier stops trading?

Ofgem is the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets, a non-ministerial government department who independently monitor the energy market. When a supplier stops trading. Ofgem ensures that the supply of energy continues to customers. They call it the Ofgem safety net. Ofgem gives responsibility to a new supplier for the customers of the closed energy company. They do their best to ensure that you do not notice the transition. We recommend you visit the Ofgem safety net site by clicking here.

What about my contract?

When Ofgem replaces your current supplier with a new supplier all old tariffs will end. You will be transferred onto a ‘deemed’ contract. A ‘deemed’ contract is one that you, as a customer, have not chosen. Very often your prices may go up as a result of the above.  Ofgem tends to accept this because the new supplier is assuming the risk and responsibility with new as a customer from a failed supplier. Please note that Ofem does not protect business customers’ credit balances. It is your responsibility to contact the insolvency company to get your money back. When Ofgem have replaced your business energy provider, the new supplier contacts you and provide guidance on outstanding credit balances. Once you have been contacted by your new supplier you are then free to shop around for a better deal (it is best not to switch suppliers during the transition). You can you EnergyBillKill to switch easily.

What is a letter of authority?

The Letter of Authority (LoA) is a letter that gives permission to an energy switching service like EnergyBillKill to help you switch business energy providers. LoA allows EnergyBillKIll to get you best prices in the market. You have to agree and sign all business energy contracts. LoA does not allow EnergyBillKill to sign any contracts on your behalf or commit you to any contractual obligation. LoA basically gives us permission to speak to suppliers on your behalf. This is standard practice across the industry. LoA signing is very easy in our EnergyBillKIll app – no need to print out any documents.

EnergyBillKill LoA explicitly states that while we can get you the best prices and help you switch business energy providers, we do not have the right to agree to a contract without your consent. You have all the power to switch or not to switch and which business energy deal to choose.

What is the climate change levvy?

The Climate Change Levy (CCL) is an environmental tax. This tax encourages businesses to be more environmentally aware. It was launched in April 2001, as part of the UK’s Climate Change Programme. The tax aims to deter UK businesses from heavy reliance on fossil fuels (electricity, gas and solid fuels). The tax is designed to encourage switching to green energy – solar, wind and hydropower.

Who pays CCL? Industrial, commercial, agricultural or public service sectors are all subject to the main CCL rates.

Exemptions? Some exemptions do apply. Your business may be exempt if you are:

  1. A small business using very little energy (less than 33 kWh (electricity) and/or 145 kWh (gas) a day)
  2. Domestic energy user
  3. Charity engaged in non-commercial activities

In addition, your business energy usage may be exempt from CCL if the energy:

  • won’t be used in the UK
  • won’t be used as fuel
  • will be used to generate electricity
  • been supplied from certain combined heat and power schemes

A particularly energy-intensive business, or horticultural sector, may be eligible to pay a reduced rate. This would require an agreement to be made with the Environment Agency by entering into a climate change agreement (CCA). A heavy energy usage businesses may receive up to 90% reduction on charges for electricity and a 65% reduction for gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), coal and other solid fuels.

You can check out the government website guide: https://www.gov.uk/green-taxes-and-reliefs

Your bill

How do I understand my British Gas bill?

Business energy bills are confusing. They have many numbers, several pages and different terminologies. At the same time, business energy bills are very important to compare your business energy prices and find the lowest cost energy company in the market. Find out how to read your British Gas bill here >

How do I understand my EDF Energy bill?

To help small business owners we are writing blogs about reading and understanding business energy bills. In this blog, we focus on EDF Energy Business energy bills. We use EDF Energy’s own example provided on their website, learn how to read your EDF bill here >

How do I understand my NPower bill?

To help small business owners we are writing blogs about reading and understanding business energy bills. In this blog, we focus on NPower energy bills. We use NPower’s own example provided on their website, learn how to read your NPower bill here >

How do I understand my SSE bill?

To help small business owners we are writing blogs about reading and understanding business energy bills. In this blog, we focus on SSE Business energy bills. We use SSE’s own example provided on their website, learn how to read your SSE bill here >

How do I understand my EOn bill?

To help small business owners we are writing blogs about reading and understanding business energy bills. In this blog, we focus on EOn Business energy bills. We use EOn’s own example provided on their website, learn how to read your EOn bill here >

How do I understand my Scottish Power bill?

To help small business owners we are writing blogs about reading and understanding business energy bills. In this blog, we focus on Scottish Power Business energy bills. We use Scottish Power’s own example provided on their website, learn how to read your Scottish Power bill here >

How do I understand my Opus Energy bill?

To help small business owners we are writing blogs about reading and understanding business energy bills. In this blog, we focus on Opus Energy, energy bills. We use Opus Energy’s own example provided on their website, learn how to read your Opus Energy bill here >

© 2019 MACH EMC2 Ltd t/a EnergyBillKill, registered in England and Wales.

© 2019 MACH EMC2 Ltd t/a EnergyBillKill, registered in England and Wales.